Rescue Randy manikin by Simulaids

This Rescue Randy Casualty Care product and Casualty Care Rescue Randy Product Guide will highlight all the main components​ and features​ of the rescue randy CC and explain the following: 

  • What it can be used for (Rescue Randy Training) 
  • Everything that is included in it 
  • Casualty Care Rescue Randy Product Guide 
  • Casualty Care Rescue Randy Features 
  • How to set it up and other details 
  • Table of Contents – ​​ 
  • ​​​What is a Casualty Care Rescue Randy manikin?​​ 

​​​What is a Casualty Care Rescue Randy manikin?​​ 

Simulaids Casualty Care Rescue Randy is a weight-distributed full-body tactical operations manikin that is uniquely designed for realistic training in treating the 3 most preventable causes of death: massive bleeding, tension pneumothorax, and airway obstruction. Casualty Care Rescue Randy offers lifelike training solutions for real life situations and is perfect for training TCCC (Tactical Combat Casualty Care) for all service members, and TECC (Tactical Emergency Casualty Care) for all EMS, EMT, and LEO professionals. 

What is the Rescue Randy manikin used for? 

Rescue Randy allows for realistic training on the procedures that treat the 3 most preventable causes of death: 

  • Massive Bleeding 
  • Tension Pneumothorax 
  • Airway Obstruction 

Casualty Care Rescue Randy allows for realistic training on procedures that treat the 3 most preventable causes of death, making it perfect for Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) and Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) training: 

  1. Massive hemorrhage can be managed in femoral and brachial extremity wounds and inguinal and carotid junctional wounds with simulated human blood flow pressure (2-3 psi) from the manual foot pump that comes with Casualty Care Rescue Randy. The silicone wounds are integrated into the fabric of the overlay for a realistic feeling. Treatment interventions include using extremity and junctional tourniquets, wound packing, hemostatic dressings, and pressure dressings. 
  1. CCRR’s airway can be managed by oral/nasal airway devices, cricothyroidotomy, and pressure dressings. Casualty Care Rescue Randy supports multiple training cycles with each repairable neck skin, and multiple repairable tracheas for the cricothyroidotomy procedure. 
  1. Treatment of tension pneumothorax with placement of a needle decompression device at the 4th/5th intercostal space in the anterior axillary line, and at the 3nd/3rd intercostal space in the midclavicular line. 

Casualty Care Rescue Randy also has a penetrating chest wound that allows for occlusive dressing and can be used for initial active scene and extraction interventions. CCRR addresses the training needs/curricula for TCCC (Tactical Combat Casualty Care) for all service members, and TECC (Tactical Emergency Casualty Care) for all EMS, EMT, and LEO professionals. 

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Casualty Care Rescue Randy Manikin Details ​​ 

Size and weight: Unlike the original Rescue Randy which comes in multiple sizes, Casualty Care Rescue Randy is only available in 1 size. The CCRR manikin itself is 5’5” and weighs 55 lbs; the overlay weighs 28 lbs.   

Cost: Casualty Care Rescue Randy costs $17,995.00, making it an affordable choice for a tactical operations manikin. 

Manufacturers: Casualty Care Rescue Randy is manufactured by Simulaids. 

Click here to learn more.

How is Casualty Care Rescue Randy different from the Rescue Randy Combat Challenge Manikin?

Both Casualty Care Rescue Randy and Rescue Randy Combat Challenge are made from the same Rescue Randy form, with weight-distribution and articulated joints. The Rescue Randy Combat Challenge Manikin is great for patient handling, transportation, and extrication techniques EMS, EMT, Police, and Search and Rescue.  

The Casualty Care Rescue Randy may also be used in patient handling, transportation, and extrication training, but also has inner and outer suits/overlays with features to train the top 3 preventable causes of death:  

  1. Massive hemorrhage control (wound packing and tourniquet use at 4 sites, and sucking chest wound) 
  1. Airway management (oral/nasal devices and cricothyroidotomy) 
  1. Treatment of tension pneumothorax with the placement of a needle decompression device.  

These additional training features were designed for TCCC and TECC training for all service members, EMS, EMT, and LEO professionals, making CCRR the optimal choice for TCCC and TECC training. 

What is included with the Rescue Randy simulation manikin?

The Casualty Care Rescue Randy includes:  

  • 1 Casualty Care Rescue Randy manikin 
  • 1 hard transfer case (for accessories) 
  • 1 outer skin 
  • 1 inner skin 
  • 1 mechanical (foot-powered) simulated blood pump 
  • Hose set (includes 4 color-coded connector hoses that have been secured together)  
  • 10 repairable tracheas 
  • 3 reparable neck skins 
  • 1 silicone repair kit 
  • Blood powder (makes 5 gallons) 
  • Shorts and instructions 

How to properly clean and maintain the CC Rescue Randy

When training sessions are completed, proper cleaning/drying procedures must be followed to maintain the CCRR. To properly clean and maintain CCRR, the blood flow lines must be flushed with water after each use. To clean the overlays, water and a mild all-purpose cleaner (e.g. 409), followed by a water rinse may be used. After rinsing, air dry the overlays before storing the manikin. 

More details at: https://www.worldpoint.com/rescue-randy-casualty-care 

What are Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) and Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) training curriculums?

  • TCCC is based on Care Under Fire, Tactical Field Care, and Tactical Evacuation Care to address the three most preventable causes of death: hemorrhage; tension pneumothorax; and airway obstruction. The TCCC follows the MARCH algorithm (Massive Bleeding, Airway, Respiration, Circulation, Head) and covers the lifesaving skills of rapid casualty assessment, tourniquet application, hemostatic dressing, pressure dressing, and airway maneuvers, and is intended for all service members
  • Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) is based on the same principles as TCCC, but accounts for differences in the civilian environment. The TECC curriculum teaches EMS practitioners of all levels how to respond to and care for patients in a civilian tactical environment. 
  • Casualty Care Rescue Randy was uniquely designed to provide realistic training in the 3 most preventable causes of death – massive bleeding, tension pneumothorax, and airway obstruction – and its features are compliant with TECC/TCCC scenarios. CCRR’s manual foot pump delivers blood to femoral, brachial, inguinal, and carotid wounds, and allows for treatment interventions using extremity and junctional tourniquets, wound packing, and pressure bandages. Airway management can be accomplished on CCRR with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, and cricothyroidotomy. Tension pneumothorax can be treated on CCRR with Needle Decompression at the anterior axillary line (4th/5th intercostal space) and at the 2nd/3rd intercostal space in the mid-clavicular line, and a penetrating chest wound allows for occlusive dressing to be applied.  

How does Rescue Randy assist training for the TECC and TCCC curriculum? 

There is a tremendous need for realistic, user-repairable manikins to teach first responders’ proper tactical techniques that are affordable and rugged enough to be used in the field. CCRR meets all of those requirements and is uniquely designed for enhanced realistic training in treating the 3 most preventable causes of death – massive bleeding, tension pneumothorax, and airway obstruction. With CCRR’s airway management training features (nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, and cricothyroidotomy), massive hemorrhage training features (femoral and brachial extremity wounds, inguinal and carotid junctional wounds), tension pneumothorax training features, and a penetrating chest wound, CCRR offers life-like training solutions for real-life situations that are compliant with TCCC/TECC scenarios. 

How do you properly set up a Casualty Care Rescue Randy Mankin?

  • Unpack all the components and lay them out. 
  • Perform a pre-operational service check. 
  • Inner Skin 
    • Ensure that there are no rips or tears. 
    • Ensure that all the tubes are in place. 
    • Put the inner skin on Randy. 
      • During this process, keep track of the tubes being sure not to crush, pinch, kink, twist, or compromise the tubes in any way. With the zipper completely open, put the inner skin over both feet and pull it up tight into the hip area. 
      • Work the fabric to be sure that all of the material is above the knees. 
      • Put the hands into the arm holes and work the material up both arms at the same rate. 
      • When the material is up to the top of the shoulders, lift both arms over CCRR’s head to pull it up right. 
      • Make sure that all of the tubes are coming out of the Velcro flap without being crushed, pinched, kinked, twisted or anything else that may compromise the flow of fluids within the tubes. 
      • Zip up the inner skin. 
      • Do any final alignments to the inner skin so it fits properly. 
  • Outer Skin 
    • Ensure that there are no rips or tears.  
    • Ensure that all the tubes connected to the wounds on the outer skin are in place. 
    • Test that the wounds and their tubes are open and not clogged or pinched; do this by blowing air through the tube. 
    • Ensure that the edges of all wounds are still properly secured to the outer skin. 
    • Put the outer skin on Randy. 

Because the outer skin needs to be tight and wrinkle-free, it takes a sequence to put it on. Follow these steps to have the skin on or off in just a couple of minutes. 

  • During this entire process, keep track of the tubes being sure not to crush, pinch, kink or compromise the tubes in any way. 
  • With the zipper completely open, put the outer skin over both feet and pull the suit up tight into the hip area. 
  • Work the fabric to be sure that all the material is above the knees. 
  • Plug in the tubes for the inguinal and femoral wounds. 
  • Work the outer skin up over the waist making sure that the tubes that were just connected lie in the proper position. 
  • Put the hands into the arm holes and work the material up the arms at the same rate. 
  • When the material is up to the top of the shoulder, lift both arms over the head to help pull it up tight. 
  • Loosen up the outer skin and connect the neck and the brachial wounds. 
  • Ensure that all the tubes are coming out of the Velcro flap without being crushed, pinched, kinked, twisted, or anything else that might compromise the flow of fluids within the tubes. 
  • Zip up the outer skin. 
  • Do any final adjustments to the outer skin so it fits properly. 
  • Place preferred clothing over CCRR. 

For more information, check out this video created by Nasco Healthcare

How can Casualty Care Rescue Randy be used for rescue training? 

Casualty Care Rescue Randy closely replicates the weight, feel, and resiliency of a human body, making CCRR perfect for rescue training in situations too hazardous or uncomfortable for human volunteers. CCRR is fully articulated for positioning in widely diversified training environments, such as seated in a car, positioned in a smoke-filled room, and immobilized on a stretcher for mountain rescue. CCRR is a popular choice for National and State parks, Search and Rescue in metropolitan areas, EMT, police, fire, and other emergency management teams. 

We would like to include guidance on how to perform enhanced and realistic training for treating the top three preventable causes of death using Rescue Randy: 

How do you stop massive bleeding using a Rescue Randy manikin? 

Wound packing and tourniquets can be used at 4 different locations – neck, brachial (left), inguinal (left), and femoral (right) – to stop massive bleeding on Casualty Care Rescue Randy. Treatment interventions, extremity and junctional tourniquets, wound packing, and pressure bandages can be used. Treatment of a sucking chest wound is also possible. 

Treating tension pneumothorax using a Rescue Randy manikin: Needle decompression procedures can be done at both anterior and axillary locations on Casualty Care Rescue Randy to treat tension pneumothorax.  

Treating airway obstruction using a Rescue Randy manikin: Airway obstruction can be treated with surgical airway (cricothyroidotomy) on CCRR. CCRR supports multiple training cycles with each repairable neck skin, and multiple repairable tracheas. 

Ready to Schedule Your Rescue Randy Casualty Care Product Demo? 

For more pricing information: Please contact our sales team for more information today!  

They’re standing by waiting to help: sales@worldpoint.com

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